Chartered Institute of Building Magazine of the Chartered Institute of Building
CM NEWSLETTER
  • 7 Oct 2011
  • 0 comments

BIM wins says Laing but QSs shun it

Laing O’Rourke, the UK’s largest contractor, is to make the use of building information modelling mandatory on all its new projects, Building reported.

Laing said its use was “key” to it winning the hotly contested race to build London’s Cheesegrater tower.

But Laing’s comments came as research by the RICS showed that only one in 10 QSs were actively considering adopting the system which requires firms to conform to a set of standard processes and 3D modelling of projects.

The survey found that only one in 10 QSs were using BIM regularly, while less than a third had had some limited engagement with the system.

The RICS responded by calling on the profession to “get its act together” and adopt BIM. The government has announced that it is making its use mandatory on all government projects within five years.

James Eaton, head of cost management at Laing O’Rourke and head of BIM, said private sector demand for BIM was increasing, challenging the conventional wisdom that the public sector will drive adoption of the system.

Eaton said that Laing O’Rourke’s advanced use of BIM had helped the contractor edge out Skanska - which is also using BIM - in the final round of the tender for the Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners-designed Leadenhall building run by joint developers British Land and Oxford Properties.

“Our 3D BIM model allowed us to explain how we are going to build the project. The developers said we demonstrated a discipline on the process that they’d never seen before,” Eaton said.

He added that BIM had allowed the firm to get involved in other projects at an earlier stage and had prompted the company to invest more in its facilities management arm.

Responding to  the RICS’ BIM survey, Paul Morrell, the government’s chief construction adviser, warned QSs they were “hazarding” their businesses by not adopting the system.

  • Laing O’Rourke and Manchester City Council have signed a £95 million contract to refurbish and restore the city’s central library and extend the town hall, Construction News reported.

The project will use BIM, with the intention to develop a Level 4 BIM model that will be used for operation and maintenance after completion of construction works.

Leave a comment

News

25 May 2017 Fire investigations uncover the cost and scale of poor workmanship

25 May 2017 Build UK works towards single safety assessment

25 May 2017 Skanska names new executive vice president

25 May 2017 ITV submits plans for new South Bank HQ

25 May 2017 Cooling system for Qatar 2022 stadium revealed

25 May 2017 VIDEO: First phase of Wimbledon's No.1 Court project completed

25 May 2017 Arup attacked by 'ransomware' in Hong Kong

23 May 2017 Reader panel's thoughts on the general election

23 May 2017 New procurement method to trial at Derby Silk Mill

23 May 2017 Housing associations' output up 13% last year

23 May 2017 Wates promotes sustainable innovations again

23 May 2017 The world's five most important mega-projects

23 May 2017 Chris Blythe picks up leading membership award

22 May 2017 General election: What policies will win construction's vote?

22 May 2017 Three company directors jailed for manslaughter

22 May 2017 Qatar 2022 workers still suffering abuse, says Amnesty

22 May 2017 L&G makes senior hires to boost offsite operation

22 May 2017 Sky Fence stops drones flying over prison

21 May 2017 CDM 2015 reforms fail to hit home, reveals survey

18 May 2017 Wates to revamp Goldfinger's Brutalist tower